April 3, 2014

The border is not a line. It’s a place. 

Great project from NPR. http://apps.npr.org/borderland/#_ 

January 20, 2014
Lovely project from audio producers Josie Holtzman and Isaac Kestenbaum.
"Winters Past is an audio project about our changing winter.
These audio pieces will allow you to experience winter the way it was, is now, and the way it could be in the future.  But you’ll have to get outside first—these are “soundwalks,” which means they should be heard in a specific place, while walking.”

Lovely project from audio producers Josie Holtzman and Isaac Kestenbaum.

"Winters Past is an audio project about our changing winter.

These audio pieces will allow you to experience winter the way it was, is now, and the way it could be in the future.  But you’ll have to get outside first—these are “soundwalks,” which means they should be heard in a specific place, while walking.”

1:48pm
Filed under: winter walk soundwalk 
December 15, 2013
Loving this history of Christmas music with Mason Neely on Cerys’s 6Music show this morning. 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/6music/on-air
Bob Dylan, Doc Watson, Lightnin Hopkins and Bing Crosby… 

Loving this history of Christmas music with Mason Neely on Cerys’s 6Music show this morning. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/6music/on-air

Bob Dylan, Doc Watson, Lightnin Hopkins and Bing Crosby… 

11:51am
Filed under: christmas 
December 15, 2013

wnycradiolab:

The Science of Animal Locomotion by Eadweard Muybridge, in GIF form.

December 15, 2013
englishmodernism:

Seven swans a~swimming. 12 Days of Christmas. 1944 Bantam Picture Book lithographed by Margaret Levetus. #illustration #design #lithography #printmaking #bantam #swans #seven #xmas #folkart #vintage #popularart #noelcarrington

englishmodernism:

Seven swans a~swimming.
12 Days of Christmas. 1944 Bantam Picture Book lithographed by Margaret Levetus.
#illustration #design #lithography #printmaking #bantam #swans #seven #xmas #folkart #vintage #popularart #noelcarrington

November 25, 2013

nprmusic:

There is no shortage of folk and country songs about booze. But what makes the Mandolin Orange tune “Waltz About Whiskey” so enchanting is its effortlessness. Watch the rising folk duo perform the song live for FolkAlley.

(via npr)

8:45pm
Filed under: folk bluegrass country 
November 21, 2013

Forever Young: Love and Marriage from Falling Tree on Vimeo.

Preview for Eleanor McDowell & Hana Walker-Brown’s series of ‘documentary pop songs’ - Forever Young. Coming soon to Radio 4. Listen here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03hxjr7 

November 21, 2013
Northern Soul Radio
nprmusic:

It’s been 40 years since the first all-night R&B party at the Wigan Casino nightclub in Manchester, England. That’s when Britain went crazy for soul music. From KALX, stream a 24/7 mix devoted to the best R&B songs you’ve likely never heard.
Photo: John Minihan/Getty Images

Northern Soul Radio

nprmusic:

It’s been 40 years since the first all-night R&B party at the Wigan Casino nightclub in Manchester, England. That’s when Britain went crazy for soul music. From KALX, stream a 24/7 mix devoted to the best R&B songs you’ve likely never heard.

Photo: John Minihan/Getty Images

(via npr)

November 13, 2013
New 99% Invisible episode.
There is an allure to unbuilt structures: the utopian, futuristic transports; the impossibly tall skyscrapers; even the horrible highways. They all capture our imagination with what could have been.
Listen here. 

New 99% Invisible episode.

There is an allure to unbuilt structures: the utopian, futuristic transports; the impossibly tall skyscrapers; even the horrible highways. They all capture our imagination with what could have been.

Listen here

10:12am
Filed under: unbuilt 99% invisible map 
November 8, 2013

kateoplis:

Murmuration (bonus

November 5, 2013

Another England 2: GRANADA from Maxy Neil Bianco on Vimeo.

November 5, 2013
Jeb’s Jukebox - Caught by the River

November 5, 2013
BBC Radio 6 Music - Guy Garvey's Finest Hour, 03/11/2013

Still two hours of the finest radio you’ll hear any time, anywhere. A beautiful start to the Finest Hour in its new Sunday afternoon slot. Nina Simone, Jolie Holland, Rufus Wainwright, Tom Waits, Joan as Policewoman, Etta James, Diane Cluck and Little Dragon. And Guy, lovely Guy. 

12:35pm
Filed under: guy garvey elbow 6music bbc music sunday 
November 5, 2013
Grayson Perry’s Reith Lectures for Radio 4. Click through image to listen.
"…when I entered the art world, the word that was constantly coming up on people’s lips was “post-modernism” because at that point in the early 80s, it was sort of established by that point that modernism with its succession of art movements had come to an end and we were now in a period where anything could go. And I felt cheated. I wanted to plant my revolutionary flag and sign up to a definite art movement that I knew you know we could go, “Wooh, yeah, you’re the old people who made rusty metal sculptures. We’re the new people who are making this sort of work.” But it didn’t really happen. I felt a bit cheated. I wanted to feel like Alan Jones did in the early 60s when he first saw a work by Lichtenstein, the American artist, and he saw this piece that was just a leg opening a pedal bin - it was in a show at the Tate Modern very recently - and he said it was like culture shock. He said it was amazingly liberating that this could be contemporary art. And I wanted that experience, I wanted that shock. I’ve never really had it. 
So when I emerged into the art world, I felt a bit like one of those Japanese soldiers, you know, who’d been holed up in an island for sort of ten years and sort of stumbled out the jungle with my rifle you know ready for the fight, and it was all over and I had to be sort of talked down from it a bit really.”

Grayson Perry’s Reith Lectures for Radio 4. Click through image to listen.

"…when I entered the art world, the word that was constantly coming up on people’s lips was “post-modernism” because at that point in the early 80s, it was sort of established by that point that modernism with its succession of art movements had come to an end and we were now in a period where anything could go. And I felt cheated. I wanted to plant my revolutionary flag and sign up to a definite art movement that I knew you know we could go, “Wooh, yeah, you’re the old people who made rusty metal sculptures. We’re the new people who are making this sort of work.” But it didn’t really happen. I felt a bit cheated. I wanted to feel like Alan Jones did in the early 60s when he first saw a work by Lichtenstein, the American artist, and he saw this piece that was just a leg opening a pedal bin - it was in a show at the Tate Modern very recently - and he said it was like culture shock. He said it was amazingly liberating that this could be contemporary art. And I wanted that experience, I wanted that shock. I’ve never really had it. 

So when I emerged into the art world, I felt a bit like one of those Japanese soldiers, you know, who’d been holed up in an island for sort of ten years and sort of stumbled out the jungle with my rifle you know ready for the fight, and it was all over and I had to be sort of talked down from it a bit really.”

November 5, 2013