July 23, 2013
Krissy Clark on telling stories of place. 
“I became a journalist via road trips. In the late 1980’s, my father and I took a series of drives on weekends, together in his beat-up brown Mercedes. I was young and curious; he was old and sick with the emphysema that would later kill him when I was in high school. We drove because he had things to show me, most of all the land surrounding the San Francisco Bay, where our family has lived since 1848. I was navigator, squinting over maps, fingering shorelines, and tracing roads. As I looked out the window, my dad told stories of what we saw. 
Down that road, in the little town of Birds Landing, were the ruins of my great-great-grandfather’s store, which supplied gold-seeking forty-niners. (Now the building sits in the shadow of an industrial wind farm.) Up that hill, on Vallejo Street in San Francisco, was where my dad and his mother before him grew up. (My great-grandparents moved into the house after their original house was damaged in the 1906 earthquake.) Past that tollbooth—see it through the fog?—was the place where as teenagers, my dad and his best friend climbed up the base of the Golden Gate Bridge (or so they told us) while it was under construction.
It was on these trips that I first fell in love with a place and its people, and I understood that a landscape is made of stories over time, layer upon layer, like geologic strata.”

Photo by Krissy Clark 

Krissy Clark on telling stories of place. 

I became a journalist via road trips. In the late 1980’s, my father and I took a series of drives on weekends, together in his beat-up brown Mercedes. I was young and curious; he was old and sick with the emphysema that would later kill him when I was in high school. We drove because he had things to show me, most of all the land surrounding the San Francisco Bay, where our family has lived since 1848. I was navigator, squinting over maps, fingering shorelines, and tracing roads. As I looked out the window, my dad told stories of what we saw. 

Down that road, in the little town of Birds Landing, were the ruins of my great-great-grandfather’s store, which supplied gold-seeking forty-niners. (Now the building sits in the shadow of an industrial wind farm.) Up that hill, on Vallejo Street in San Francisco, was where my dad and his mother before him grew up. (My great-grandparents moved into the house after their original house was damaged in the 1906 earthquake.) Past that tollbooth—see it through the fog?—was the place where as teenagers, my dad and his best friend climbed up the base of the Golden Gate Bridge (or so they told us) while it was under construction.

It was on these trips that I first fell in love with a place and its people, and I understood that a landscape is made of stories over time, layer upon layer, like geologic strata.”

Photo by Krissy Clark 

3:46pm
Filed under: storytelling place 
July 4, 2013
I’ve been enjoying exploring the website of new(ish) radio co-op Open Audio, set up by producers Nina Perry, Iain Chambers and Vivienne Perry. All very inspiring. We’ll be hearing lots of good programmes from them in 2013 and beyond I’m sure, starting with Nina Perry’s new feature ‘A Song of Bricks and Mortar’ for Radio 3’s Between the Ears, which takes its inspiration from this quote by Benjamin Britten:
"Composing is like driving down a foggy road toward a house. Slowly you see more details of the house - the colour of the slates and bricks, the shape of the windows. The notes are the bricks and the mortar of the house."
"Via a compositional road trip, artists in the process of creating and making give insight into their own personal creative process, and what drives them to create. Like a play within a play or a documentary that documents itself - this feature dips its toe into the infinite and timeless nature of artistic creativity as an integral part of being human."

I’ve been enjoying exploring the website of new(ish) radio co-op Open Audio, set up by producers Nina Perry, Iain Chambers and Vivienne Perry. All very inspiring. We’ll be hearing lots of good programmes from them in 2013 and beyond I’m sure, starting with Nina Perry’s new feature ‘A Song of Bricks and Mortar’ for Radio 3’s Between the Ears, which takes its inspiration from this quote by Benjamin Britten:

"Composing is like driving down a foggy road toward a house. Slowly you see more details of the house - the colour of the slates and bricks, the shape of the windows. The notes are the bricks and the mortar of the house."

"Via a compositional road trip, artists in the process of creating and making give insight into their own personal creative process, and what drives them to create. Like a play within a play or a documentary that documents itself - this feature dips its toe into the infinite and timeless nature of artistic creativity as an integral part of being human."

5:30pm
Filed under: radio audio storytelling 
February 19, 2013
So you want to be a radio producer

Lovely article by Tina Antolini for Matador

"Here’s the bottom line: Start playing with sound. Think of a story you’d like to tell, about your friends, your neighborhood, even just yourself, and try to imagine how you could make it come alive in sound. What would surprise the world about these people and places that are so familiar to you? Go around your neighborhood with your recorder and mic and just listen to what’s around you. Try to think of what the sonic imprint of the place you live is — what sounds are unique to it? What sounds say “home” to you? Get in the habit of thinking sonically. Once you start doing it, it’ll be hard to stop. It’s as if you discover a whole parallel world that you’d only been half noticing before.

Start editing the sounds you record — even if you don’t know what you’re doing. You can find some helpful technical guides on Transom, workshops to listen to from the Third Coast International Audio Festival, and storytelling guides from Ira and Duke’s John Biewen. Put a story with some of those sounds up on Cowbird. Send it to me: I’ll listen. So will others.

And, speaking of listening, do a lot of it. The best way to learn how to construct a story is to pay attention to how the pros do it. Next time you hear a story on This American Life that you adore, listen to how they decided to build the narrative. What questions did Ira ask? What was funny or interesting about it? What details did they include that made the story come to life, which painted a vivid image of the characters or the scene in your mind?

Next time you go to a new place, bring your recorder with you. Use it as a tool for discovery, an excuse to talk to strangers, a way into this new, unfamiliar place. You’ll be an audio storyteller in no time.”

Read the full piece here and check out Tina’s beautiful tumblr here: http://tinaantolini.tumblr.com/

January 17, 2013

October 17, 2012
All kinds of storytellers...

October 12, 2012
Mmmmm… Cowbird
Beautiful. New Scientist called it “a Wikipedia for life’s meaningful moments”. That’s good enough for me! 

Mmmmm… Cowbird

Beautiful. New Scientist called it “a Wikipedia for life’s meaningful moments”. That’s good enough for me! 

October 26, 2011
Imagining the Story - Rob Rosenthal on Transom

Very useful post by Rob Rosenthal on the Transom website about storytelling in sound. I’m just setting out to make a new piece and this has given me some focus and inspiration! Hope it might do the same for you. 

"After some story research and before starting fieldwork, I encourage students to ask themselves a few questions. Questions such as:

• In my wildest storytelling fantasy, how would I like to tell the story I’m producing?

• What will grab listeners by the ears?

• What’s the most narratively compelling way to communicate both the factual and emotional truth of the story?

• What might work as the beginning, middle, and end?

• How can I be sure to capture conflict, tension, and other dramatic elements?”

June 29, 2011
True Stories Told Live benefit gig coming up if you’re in London. Tickets are pricey at £22 but I can recommend the event. 
Click on the photo to read the Time Out review. 

True Stories Told Live benefit gig coming up if you’re in London. Tickets are pricey at £22 but I can recommend the event. 

Click on the photo to read the Time Out review. 

March 29, 2011

One in 8 Million Project

My new favourite way to waste an afternoon…

Stunning photographs and stories of New Yorkers. The project takes one individual each week and documents their daily life - their struggles and tribulations, their hopes and dreams - in their own words and in beautiful black and white photography. 

March 16, 2011
Battery Radio Website - amazing feature-makers
News of their upcoming broadcasts can be found here: http://www.batteryradio.com/Pages/TuneIn.html

Battery Radio Website - amazing feature-makers

News of their upcoming broadcasts can be found here: http://www.batteryradio.com/Pages/TuneIn.html